Mad Men Corrupted but Rank with Beauty


Conor McGarrigle, a Dublin based student of art and media, put together an episode of AMC’s Mad Men that was incompletely and improperly downloaded via bittorrent. The result is a massive mixture of signal processing errors, cut scenes, and fractured visuals. The video is to provide a look into the corruption inherent in the bittorrent protocol that stitches miniature components together from different sources to recreate files.

The jumbled episode is “The Summer Man” from season 4 of the show. Perhaps I’m looking too deeply into the story, but the boundaries implied by the plot add layers of meaning to the haunting visual piece. Don Draper is dealing with Anna’s death. He cuts back on drinking and is determined to make life decisions as represented by Bethany and Faye.

In the video images morph together, time repeats and jumps in non-linear fashion, the ending meets the beginning, and curious thoughts loop, cascade, and disintegrate.


Attribution

Conor McGarrigle


  • silentreign

    I think it’s a bit of a stretch to call it “corruption inherent in the bittorrent protocol.”  Bittorrent is inherently reliable, and I’ve downloaded hundreds of large files via bittorrent without a single corruption.
     
    The video posted looks like it came from an incomplete download.  If it’s actual corruption, it was most likely caused by a problem on your end, not from an inherent problem with bittorrent.

  • silentreign

    I think it’s a bit of a stretch to call it “corruption inherent in the bittorrent protocol.”  Bittorrent is inherently reliable, and I’ve downloaded hundreds of large files via bittorrent without a single corruption.
     
    The video posted looks like it came from an incomplete download.  If it’s actual corruption, it was most likely caused by a problem on Coner’s end, not from an inherent problem with bittorrent.

  • saulrh

    To do this, he had to turn off file integrity checking *and* find a bad network connection *and* fail to verify the file after downloading it *and then* filter out the vast numbers of fatal and invisible errors to leave behind only the ones in the critical region of visibility. There is no corruption “inherent” in the protocol, any more than there is corruption “inherent” in the image formed by your monitor’s pixels or the consciousness you string together from one planck time to the next. If you’re going to try to make a point about technology, at least get the technology right, otherwise it just looks like a cock-up.
     
    </rant>

  • justncase80

    You have to be high to think this is beautiful.

    • silentreign

       @justncase80 Nope, that didn’t work, either…
       
      (Hmmm, weird, my first comment from a couple of days ago disappeared.  Oh well.)

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